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Online resource launched for parents facing teen addiction

December 13, 2010
by News release
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The Partnership at Drugfree.org has launched an online program called "Time To Get Help," a first-of-its-kind Web site and online community designed to provide parents of teens and young adults with lifesaving information when families are in crisis and facing their child's addiction.

Guided by the input and real-world experiences of the organization's Parent Advisory Board, the site offers comprehensive insight into adolescent alcohol and drug abuse, dependence and addiction; support from top experts and other parents who have been there; and treatment options for their child and family.

According to Steve Pasierb, president and CEO of The Partnership at Drugfree.org, Time To Get Help bridges the gap between the questions parents have when it comes to their child's drug and alcohol addiction and the answers and resources they desperately need for treatment.

"It was created with parents—and for parents—as one destination to find easy-to-use, non-judgmental and science-based information and support," Pasierb said.

Addressing the need for clear, available information for parents, the new peer-to-peer resource offers two practical e-Books, both free of charge, that educate them on what they need to know about youth intervention and treatment.

The downloadable e-Books and new site provide the most current information and cutting-edge advice from experts including the Treatment Research Institute (TRI), one of the field's leading research groups specializing in addiction and substance use issues.

Housed under the "Get Treatment" and the "Learn" sections of The Partnership at Drugfree.org's newly relaunched Web site, the Intervention e-Book helps parents respond when they think or know their child is using alcohol or other drugs.

The organization's Treatment e-Book provides advice and guidance when it appears their child may need treatment for a serious drug problem, including the right questions to ask a prospective treatment program and tips on how to pay for treatment.

Along with its "Community" section where parents can share their stories, Time To Get Help also features "Helping Hand," where difficult questions can be asked and peer-to-peer and expert advice on intervention, treatment and recovery are offered.

Under "Make a Plan," worksheets and guides help direct a parent's conversation with treatment program staff in deciding which one is the best fit for their child and checklists help them take care of their own emotional needs while going through these times.

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