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The Slugger's Story

July 16, 2008
by Gary Enos
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Major League Baseball All-Star Josh Hamilton this week won over a city that isn't easily impressed. The talent he displayed on a national stage during All-Star week in New York gave focus to his story of illness and recovery. It might take longer to determine whether the attention Hamilton is inviting will play a major part in changing attitudes about addiction. Some members of the media have presented Hamilton's story eloquently, but at other times problems remain in evidence. At one point during the All-Star television broadcast, an announcer paused dramatically during a recitation of Hamilton's past problems and reminded viewers that these were "self-inflicted" ills. Just so as not to confuse this athlete's comeback with that of current major league pitchers who have returned from battling cancer, I guess. Yet another reminder that the language of addiction is different. A press release issued today by New Jersey inpatient treatment agency Seabrook House stated, "Though many people are skeptical of his sobriety, Josh is using his experience to teach others." I agree that there's enormous potential for people to be touched meaningfully by Hamilton's experience. I just hope that as the story continues to be told, more members of the media will hit one out of the park in their storytelling, rather than swing feebly at an opportunity to educate.

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Gary Enos

Editor

Gary Enos

@apeditor

www.addictionpro.com

Gary A. Enos has been the editor of Addiction Professional since its inception. He...